Kamil Jagodzinski

#RUNCOP21
Start time:

09 November, 13:48

Distance:

9,2 km, Skyttegatan 4, Kiruna, SE

I run for the Arctic Snowman

My name is Kamil Jagodziński, I live in Rovaniemi, the capital of Finnish Lapland and the offical hometown of Santa Claus. I work as a project manager of the Arctic Centre – one of the best research institutes in the world dealing with the Arctic region. During last 2 years I’ve managed a project ’Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment of development of the Arctic’. Living in the Arctic region gives me a chance to observe rapid climate changes on a daily basis. And it’s sad to see what is happening, not only because we - humans are responsible for that, but because we - humans do so little to change the status quo. Melting ice in the High North brings both challenges and opportunities. Changing climate impacts marine transport, fisheries, extraction of oil and gas resources and mining business among others. It causes social and cultural changes in the region and far beyond. Clearly: what happens in the Arctic does not stay in the Arctic anymore. Now, the Arctic is the most rapidly changing climate region on Earth. We research the topic, we provide decision-makers with recommendations, justifications, plans and suggestions. We publish scientific articles in the most reconized journals. We collect the data using variety of methods. We cross-check the data with our peers around the globe. We write books about it! Hard-core science, I tell you that. We popularize our discoveries and present them to those who hold the power to change things. We ask: can’t you see what’s happening? And the answer seems to be: yeah, so what? Professor Bernd Heinrich once said: 'I'm inspired no end by people who can really do great things, so I'm moved by others' dreams, by their devotion and courage and pursuit of this excellence and ehm... Especially kids. Because you realize how much difference it make in a long run. How much little things matter and how far they can take you.' I remember frosty winters with plenty of snow back home, in Poland when I was a kid. Only two decades ago. And now there are no frosty winters. Now, I tell the stories about those winters to my little nieces. Big deal! - you’ll say. But how are you going to build a snowman without snow when your kids ask you? Did you have to worry about those things, when you were a kid?

I run for the Arctic Snowman

My name is Kamil Jagodziński, I live in Rovaniemi, the capital of Finnish Lapland and the offical hometown of Santa Claus. I work as a project manager of the Arctic Centre – one of the best research institutes in the world dealing with the Arctic region. During last 2 years I’ve managed a project ’Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment of development of the Arctic’. Living in the Arctic region gives me a chance to observe rapid climate changes on a daily basis. And it’s sad to see what is happening, not only because we - humans are responsible for that, but because we - humans do so little to change the status quo. Melting ice in the High North brings both challenges and opportunities. Changing climate impacts marine transport, fisheries, extraction of oil and gas resources and mining business among others. It causes social and cultural changes in the region and far beyond. Clearly: what happens in the Arctic does not stay in the Arctic anymore. Now, the Arctic is the most rapidly changing climate region on Earth. We research the topic, we provide decision-makers with recommendations, justifications, plans and suggestions. We publish scientific articles in the most reconized journals. We collect the data using variety of methods. We cross-check the data with our peers around the globe. We write books about it! Hard-core science, I tell you that. We popularize our discoveries and present them to those who hold the power to change things. We ask: can’t you see what’s happening? And the answer seems to be: yeah, so what? Professor Bernd Heinrich once said: 'I'm inspired no end by people who can really do great things, so I'm moved by others' dreams, by their devotion and courage and pursuit of this excellence and ehm... Especially kids. Because you realize how much difference it make in a long run. How much little things matter and how far they can take you.' I remember frosty winters with plenty of snow back home, in Poland when I was a kid. Only two decades ago. And now there are no frosty winters. Now, I tell the stories about those winters to my little nieces. Big deal! - you’ll say. But how are you going to build a snowman without snow when your kids ask you? Did you have to worry about those things, when you were a kid?