Julian Harris

#130
Start time:

13 November, 15:50

Distance:

14,2 km, Kramfors, SE

I run because we are running out of time

My name is Julian Harris I am 45 years old , I am living and working here in Sweden for the Folke Bernadotte Academy and I am here to talk to you (about) why I am Running For My LIfe. Before I joined the Folke Bernadotte Academy, I worked for the International Committee or the Red Cross, bringing assistance to those people affect by armed conflict. That work took me all over the world to some very interesting places, obviously, and during my time with the ICRC I was able to see, first hand how climate change is feeding into conflict. I certainly remember in Jebel Marra in the Sudan, talking to village elders who would recount, somewhat tearfully, how back in the day the rivers running through those mountains would be full all year round. While I was there, there were villages fighting each other over wells that still gave water all year round. In Colombia I witnessed vast tracts of land that were ostensibly dead because of over intensive farming of cotton and of course that feed into unemployment and of course that feed into unemployment which in turn fed the ranks of the different armed groups, people joining not because of their political beliefs necessarily but often out of desperation and having nothing else to turn to. I am running because we are running out of time. We need today to understand that climate change will affect conflicts particularly as the most prescious resource we have, clean drinking water, will become scarcer and scarcer if the situation remains unchecked. What we need today are politicians who have the courage to make those decision that might affect our lifestyles, but will assure us a better future.

I run because we are running out of time

My name is Julian Harris I am 45 years old , I am living and working here in Sweden for the Folke Bernadotte Academy and I am here to talk to you (about) why I am Running For My LIfe. Before I joined the Folke Bernadotte Academy, I worked for the International Committee or the Red Cross, bringing assistance to those people affect by armed conflict. That work took me all over the world to some very interesting places, obviously, and during my time with the ICRC I was able to see, first hand how climate change is feeding into conflict. I certainly remember in Jebel Marra in the Sudan, talking to village elders who would recount, somewhat tearfully, how back in the day the rivers running through those mountains would be full all year round. While I was there, there were villages fighting each other over wells that still gave water all year round. In Colombia I witnessed vast tracts of land that were ostensibly dead because of over intensive farming of cotton and of course that feed into unemployment and of course that feed into unemployment which in turn fed the ranks of the different armed groups, people joining not because of their political beliefs necessarily but often out of desperation and having nothing else to turn to. I am running because we are running out of time. We need today to understand that climate change will affect conflicts particularly as the most prescious resource we have, clean drinking water, will become scarcer and scarcer if the situation remains unchecked. What we need today are politicians who have the courage to make those decision that might affect our lifestyles, but will assure us a better future.